6 Things that May Keep You Awake at Night

By Chad Taylor on March 2, 2016

What is keeping Americans awake? There is nothing more disturbing than watching the clock or staring at the ceiling.

Here Are 6 Things That Keep People Awake. Does One Apply To You?

  1. Pain. Statistics say that about 15% of Americans have chronic pain and about 2/3 of those have sleeping problems. From back paint to headaches, pain can keep you awake. Plus, the longer it keeps you awake the more annoying it becomes. If pain is keeping you awake, talk to your doctor.
  2. Hormones. Women go through hormonal changes throughout their life. There’s that monthly cycle, pregnancy, perimenopause and menopause – all can interfere with a woman’s sleeping pattern. Tender breasts, hot flashes, the need to go to the bathroom more often can all keep a woman from falling asleep or staying asleep. If your problem is chronic, talk to your doctor. If your problem is pregnancy, you’ll have a new reason to be sleep deprived in just a few months.
  3. Stress and Mental Illness. This is a which came first, the chicken or the egg, situation. The brain uses the same neurotransmitters to put you to sleep and to set your mood so it becomes a vicious cycle. Being sleep deprived can cause anxiety and depression and vice versa. Remember, depression is a treatable illness. If your problem is stress, try stress reducing strategies or get medical help.
  4. Snoring. We think of him, but it can be her! There are 37 million Americans who are chronic snores. If you live with one or are one, sleep may be more difficult. First, make sure that the snorer is not suffering from sleep apnea which is linked to serious medical conditions. If that’s not the problem, you can try an adjustable bed which might help – and, there’s always ear plugs!
  5. Illness. Sleep difficulties can be caused by medical problems. Lung disease or asthma may cause shortness of breath that disturbs sleep. Heart failure, Parkinson’s disease and other neurological diseases may count sleep problems as part of their symptoms. See your doctor if you think a medical problem or medications are part of your sleeping problem.
  6. Shift Work. Our body has a circadian rhythm that works with light and dark. Shift work disrupts that cycle. Do your best to help restore it. Keep your work place brightly lit at night. Keep the place where you sleep very dark with blackout curtains or blinds. Try to establish a consistent routine. If your shift changes, try to make those changes as infrequent as possible.

Getting a good night’s sleep means having a better day. Make your bedroom a peaceful place that is dark when you’re trying to sleep and airy and restful to the eye. Get rid of clutter and if your old mattress is what’s keeping you awake, get rid of it, too. Buying a new mattress today is both easy and affordable – check out Internet sales for great, low prices, long trial periods and delivery to your door.